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Crown wants to prevent man who attacked soldiers from attending college

In 2018 the Ontario Review Board granted Ayanle Hassan Ali permission to attend Mohawk College despite still being detained at a secure Hamilton hospital.

A man who attacked officials at a military recruitment centre with a knife, and was later acquitted due to mental illness wants the privilege to attend college.

On March 14, 2016, Ali attacked soldiers at the Canadian Forces Recruiting Centre in North York. He punched a soldier in the head then stabbed him with a large knife, leaving a three-inch wound on his arm.

In 2018 the Ontario Review Board granted Ayanle Hassan Ali permission to attend Mohawk College despite still being detained at a secure Hamilton hospital.

Now the Crown must justify to a judge why Ayanle Hassan Ali, a schizophreniac with radical Islamist beliefs, should not be allowed to attend a public college.

The Crown is also arguing that Ali should be banned from being near anyone in uniform as they believe he is too dangerous to be near any military personnel.

The Crown argues that while addressing the respondent’s mental illness and reintegrating him in a way which would not put the public in danger, the Board failed to consider the potential risk to public safety Ali may have if he were allowed in an educational community.

“The board, however, only cited the needs of the accused and his reintegration when addressing indirect supervision in the community for educational purposes, and failed to advert to, or give adequate consideration to, the paramount factor of public safety,” the Crown argued.

On March 14, 2016, Ali attacked soldiers at the Canadian Forces Recruiting Centre in North York. He punched a soldier in the head then stabbed him with a large knife, leaving a three-inch wound on his arm.

The Ontario Review Board believes he should be allowed to attend Mohawk college because he is not a terrorist. Despite this, his doctor does believe he has “potential to act out on political, or radical ideas.”

Due to his schizophrenia, Ali was found not criminally responsible for the charges of attempted murder, assault and weapons offences.

Mohawk College says that they have heard from many concerned students and staff about the possibility of Ali being in their school.

Mohawk added that, if Ali were to become a student at their school, they would probably find a way for it to be done remotely.

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